July is Fireworks Safety Month – Leave the Shows to the Pros!

Posted on July 12th, 2018 by

Although July 4th, or Independence Day, has come and gone, there is a good possibility that some of us have a few extra sparklers, or an “All the fireworks are gone, kids – time for bed!” stash of leftovers hidden behind the stale pretzels in the top cupboard.  July is Fireworks Eye Safety Month, and because fireworks sometimes become a part of many year-round celebrations, it is an excellent opportunity to clarify our understanding of the do’s and don’ts of pyrotechnic use.

While the thrill many of us derive from the thunderous booms and brilliant blooms of fireworks is undeniable, so are the sobering statistics that accompany these displays.

In recent years, in June and July alone, over 6000 fireworks related injuries occur and over 20% of those are eye injuries.  These injuries can range from temporary or more superficial issues to severe, life altering injuries including burns and bleeding in the eye, retinal detachments, and even a ruptured globe or blindness.  Many of these injuries occur to those who are not even handling the fireworks and, even more distressing is that frequently these injuries afflict children.Prevent Blindness America and the American Academy of Blindness sponsor July as Fireworks Eye …
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optomap Efficiencies in the Refractive Arena

Posted on June 26th, 2018 by

As the US population ages, the rate of cataract procedures has correspondingly increased.  By 2050 an estimated 83.7 million people in the US will be 65 and over. Due to the improvements in safety, speed and refractive outcomes of cataract surgery, the number of procedures has dramatically increased over the last 30 years.  Additionally, there has been a significant increase in the incidences of patients opting for cataract procedures before the age of 65. The expanding longevity of this aging demographic results in higher expectations that premium intraocular lens will provide continued good vision for decades.

A recent paper from Assil Eye Institute and Batra Vision in California reviews the role of ultra-widefield imaging as a standard assessment tool in cataract procedure.  This review demonstrates the value of UWF imaging as a complement to standard approaches for a comprehensive evaluation of retinal health prior to and following cataract surgery.  Evaluating the retina prior to, and after, surgery is critical for optimal outcomes. Being able to identify any pathologies before that might adversely affect or delay surgery, as well as, the high expectations for sustained positive visual outcomes from the younger demographic opting for surgery, makes a thorough …
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optomap Screening Reveals Cataract in Unsuspecting Doctor

Posted on June 18th, 2018 by

While the exact causes of cataracts are still not entirely understood, annual eye exams are still important for the diagnoses and treatment of their formation.  Even with precautions and regular exams, by the year 2020, more than 30 million Americans are expected to develop cataracts.

Most cataracts occur gradually as we age and don’t become bothersome until after age 55. However, cataracts can also be present at birth (congenital cataracts) or occur at any age as the result of an injury to the eye (traumatic cataracts). Cataracts can also be caused by diseases such as diabetes or can occur as the result of long-term use of certain medications.  While typically forming in both eyes, cataracts may not grow at the same rate. They can develop slowly or quickly, or progress to a certain point, then not get any worse. As a result, one may not notice substantial changes in their sight. Sometimes they can significantly precede symptoms and can be so subtle as to go unnoticed without a comprehensive eye exam.

When Vince Young, OD introduced Daytona, into his practice, he volunteered to be the imaging guinea pig while his staff trained on the device.  He was unnerved …
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Let’s Clear the Fog – June is Cataract Awareness Month!

Posted on June 12th, 2018 by

June is Cataract Awareness Month and while many people may consider cataracts to simply be an inevitable aspect of aging, there is a great deal more to know and understand. Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss in the United States, and the leading cause of blindness in the world. Although 24 million Americans over the age of 40 are affected by cataracts, the condition is more complex and nuanced than most may realize.

A cataract is an opacification of the natural lens, which inhibits or distorts the passage of light into the eye. The lens, located behind the pupil and iris, is typically transparent and transmits light onto the retina – the resulting signals become pictures in the brain.

Almost all of us realize and accept that as we age, we are likely to develop a cataract. However, the exact causes are still not entirely understood. Besides the natural aging process, there are several other possible risk factors for cataracts, such as:

Intense heat or long-term exposure to UV rays from the sun Certain diseases, such as diabetes Inflammation in the eye Hereditary influences Events before birth, such as German measles in the mother Long-term steroid use Eye …
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UWF Imaging Assists in Discovery and Follow-Up Care of Blunt Eye Trauma

Posted on May 21st, 2018 by

When 29-year-old Emmy came to see Uwe Canting, OD at Canting Optometry in Cary, NC, she was relatively certain that her eye was fine, but wanted to seek reassurance from her optometrist.  Emmy had received a high-impact, full-blown soccer ball to the eye during a soccer match the preceding day and while having no symptoms other than slight discomfort from the bruising, she realized that the impact was severe enough that something unseen may have occurred.

Canting notes that Emmy presented with a black eye OD, while her visual acuity was 20/20.  “The eye itself looked fine. Other than the ecchymosis, there were no immediate concerns. There was no apparent subconjunctival hemorrhage and no recession of the iris.  But, while dilated, I could see instantly that it was not normal and decided to capture an optomap image.  Sure enough, the image clearly showed the whitish sheen of Commotio retinae superiorly temporal.”  Canting recalls, “The beauty of this situation was that I had her optomap image from her last visit and I could show her, clearly and tangibly, what had occurred in her eye.”

He adds that optomap has proved to be extremely valuable for patient education in a variety of …
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