Optos plc, unveils Silverstone, a Combined Ultra-widefield Retinal Imaging Device and UWF-Guided Swept Source OCT for the Ophthalmic Market

12 October 2019

Optos plc, the leading medical retinal imaging company, part of Nikon Corporation, is pleased to announce the launch of Silverstone at the American Academy of Ophthalmology, San Francisco, CA.

Silverstone is the first of its kind, combining world-leading ultra-widefield retinal imaging with integrated, image-guided, swept source OCT.  Silverstone produces a 200° single capture optomap® image with guided OCT allowing advanced OCT imaging anywhere across the retina, from posterior pole to far periphery.  This provides unparalleled UWF guided multimodal imaging in support of detection, investigation and monitoring of retinal disease.

Silverstone provides greater imaging functionality and expands the Company’s product portfolio for ophthalmic markets.  It combines colour, autofluorescence (AF), fluorescein (FA) and Indocyanine Green (ICG) angiography with Swept Source OCT imaging capabilities.  A comprehensive exam that includes an ultra-widefield optomap® image has been shown in clinical studies to enhance pathology detection and disease management, as well as to improve clinic flow.  Now by integrating swept source OCT, Silverstone further facilitates examination of the retina from vitreous through the choroidal-scleral interface and helps guide treatment decisions.

Silverstone SS OCT

David M. Brown, MD from Retina Consultants of Houston in Houston, TX, remarked, “Silverstone is very exciting.  It’s definitely the best device we’ve seen for choroidal imaging, and the UWF-guided OCT makes it easy to scan lesions even in the far periphery.”

Robert Kennedy, CEO of Optos, commented:  I am delighted to introduce Silverstone, our newest offering for the ophthalmic market. The integration of UWF guided swept source OCT with optomap gives eye care professionals unprecedented capability to manage retinal disease.  For the first time, doctors can capture OCT scans of peripheral lesions something not readily achievable with traditional OCTs.  We are extremely excited to introduce this comprehensive solution for patient imaging to our customers.

Further product details are available at www.optosnextgen.com.

Enquiries:

Leslie Amodei, VP, Global Marketing Tel: 508-787-1414

Join us in Recognizing World Sight Day 2019, Vision First!

World Sight Day (WSD) is an annual day of awareness held on the second Thursday of October each year.  WSD aims to focus global attention on blindness and vision impairment.  The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) members work together to raise public awareness of blindness and vision impairment, influence governments to participate and designate funds for national blindness prevention funds, and to educate target audiences about blindness prevention.  World Sight Day 2019 takes place on October 10th. This year’s theme and call to action is “Vision First!”.  

Of all the people suffering from blindness or poor vision, more than a billion people suffer because they do not have access to proper eye care.  This year’s mission urges everyone to find solutions to ensure that everyone, everywhere has access to proper eye care.

Continued studies conducted by the IAPB have concluded that 80% of eyes can be saved from blindness, given the proper comprehensive care and diagnosis. Additional facts from these studies include

  • 285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide: 39 million are blind and 246 million have low vision.
  • About 90% of the world’s visually impaired live in low-income settings.
  • 80% of all visual impairment can be prevented or cured.
  • An estimated 19 million children are visually impaired. Of these, 12 million children are visually impaired due to a condition that could be easily diagnosed and corrected.
  • The global economic cost of lost work productivity due to people with poor vision has been estimated at 700 billion dollars a year.
  • 6 out of 10 people in the developed world wear glasses, contact lenses, or have had corrective eye surgery.  6 out of 10 people in the developing world are also vision impaired but have little or no access to eye care or eyeglasses.

As ambassadors of eye health, Optos would like to encourage you, eye care practitioners to participate in World Sight Day by reminding their patients to maintain a regular schedule for comprehensive eye exams including optomap®.  optomap is the only ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal image that can capture vortex ampullae in all four quadrants in a single-capture UWF image in less than ½ second.

With the ability to view up to 200 degrees of the retina eye care professionals may be able to diagnose eye pathologies earlier than with other imaging systems, contributing to greater success in preventable vision loss and blindness. View our ultra-widefield imaging devices and contact us to learn how we can help your practice.

Single-capture, Ultra-widefield Retinal Imaging Is More Efficient – By Definition

Results from a recent publication call for the use of consistent nomenclature when describing the field of view captured by retinal images. The International Widefield Imaging Study Group has proposed the need for consistent nomenclature for widefield and ultra-widefield imaging based on normal anatomic landmarks. When describing the area captured by an imaging modality, it is important to be consistent in meaning so the capabilities of the technology are clear to the reader.

The panel defines ultra-widefield as images showing retinal anatomy anterior to the vortex vein ampullae in all four quadrants.  Widefield is defined as an image centered on the fovea and includes the retina in all four quadrants posterior to and including the vortex vein ampullae. The panel recommends this standardized nomenclature for use in future publications1.

Over the last decade, many large studies have underlined the importance of appropriately imaging the periphery to support the detection and management of disease in a variety of areas including telemedicine screening2,3,4, diabetic retinopathy5,6, age-related maculardegeneration7, vascular disease8, pediatric retinal disease9, inflammatory disease10,11,12 and even some systemic diseases.  Consistently, optomap imaging has been demonstrated to capture the widest field of view in a single capture of any imaging technology14,15,16,17.

“A single capture image which provides a view of the vortex veins in all four quadrants and beyond, thus meeting the widefield & ultra-widefield definitions, would offer enhanced efficiency in a real-world clinical setting versus a montage image, whether it be manual or automated.”   
— Netan Choudhry M.D. FRCS(C) DABO

Ultra-widefield by definition
optomap color and fa images demonstrating four (4) vortex ampullae which define the boundary between widefield and ultra-widefield.

Based on the panel’s findings, a single capture ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal image, or an image with “no sweeps” can therefore provide enhanced efficiencies for practices and other clinical settings. As the ONLY single-capture UWF image to meet this definition, optomap, is the best choice for increasing efficiencies in your practice or other clinical settings.

Increase your practice efficiency and increase your revenue with optomap. No Sweeps = Increased Efficiency.

Read the full summary here: https://optos.is/NoSweepsUWF and then contact us to find out how to put optomap into your clinical setting.

Make Vision Expo West More “Efficient” with Optos

As the leaders in ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal imaging technology, Optos would like to invite you to join us at the International Vision Expo West (VEW) September 18-21 at the Sands Expo in Las Vegas. Explore what’s new at Optos by pre-scheduling your demonstration or stop by booth #MS6051 during the event.

This year Optos is a sponsor of the “Battle at the Sands: Imaging Track” competition where industry leaders, such as Dr. Mo Rafieetary, will present complex patient studies where imaging played a key role in diagnosis and treatment (and compete for bragging rights). After the winner is crowned, please join us at the workshop Wednesday, September 18th from 5-7pm in room 505 at the Sands Convention Center. Seats are limited.

Optos will also be participating in the OCT workshop, and demonstrating the functionality of our Monaco device — the only clinically-validated, 200-degree UWF retinal imaging device with integrated OCT.  Monaco produces a 200-degree, single-capture optomap image in less than ½ second and also provides cross-sectional, 40-degree OCT views of retinal structures. Join us Thursday the 19th from 12:30-2:30pm and Friday the 20th from 12:15-2:15 in room 505 to explore the benefits of Optos UWF and OCT. 

Ultra-widefield with No Sweeps?  Yes, with optomap it can be done. optomap is the only ultra-widefield retinal image that can captures vortex ampullae in all four quadrants in a single-capture UWF image in less than ½ second.  Find us throughout the show at booth #MS6051 to find out how our no sweeps imaging can potentially make your practice more efficient. For more information regarding our offerings at VEW, or if you have any questions about our UWF retinal imaging please call 800-854-3039 or email us!

optomap Assists in Management of Age-related Eye Diseases

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the United States, affecting most commonly, people over the age of 60 with increasing chances as you age, if you are overweight or if you have a family history of AMD.    

As we approach our golden years, we are at a higher risk for particular eye diseases including age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, as well as eye conditions such as dry eye and low vision.  More than 40 million Americans are currently 65 years or older, this number is expected to grow to more than 88 million by 2050 and not coincidentally, the number of Americans with age-related eye diseases is expected to double.  Early detection and treatment are key to saving sight.

For some, AMD advances so slowly that vision loss does not occur for a long time. In others, the disease progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in one or both eyes. The loss of central vision in AMD can interfere with simple everyday activities, such as the ability to see faces, drive, read, write, or do close work, such as cooking or fixing things around the house.

As the disease progresses through the asymptomatic phase, it moves from Dry AMD to Wet AMD. In geographic atrophy (dry AMD), there is a gradual breakdown of the light-sensitive cells in the macula that convey visual information to the brain, and of the supporting tissue beneath the macula. In neovascular AMD (wet AMD), abnormal blood vessels grow underneath the retina. These vessels can leak fluid and blood, which may lead to swelling and damage of the macula. It is important to assess the risk of progression from the dry type to the wet type of the disease.

Although there have been many discoveries in the understanding of the causes of AMD, including links to genetics, there remains much unknown about this complicated, degenerative disease. With the advent of multi-modality ultra-widefield (UWF™) imaging, the retinal periphery has been able to be more easily studied in AMD to determine the value in the detection and/or monitoring of the disease.  Color optomap® imaging captures the structure and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) the function, of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) which is where AMD manifests within the eye. Recent studies have revealed that 97% of patients with AMD have evidence of the disease outside of the central pole. This outcome demonstrated that drusen and reticular changes were seen in a majority of eyes, strongly indicating that AMD is more than a macular condition but one that involves the entire retina. This is being investigated in a further study that will determine whether these peripheral changes are associated with the progression of the disease.

optomap af image demonstrating AMD

Glaucoma is another leading cause of irreversible blindness in the US and around the world with more than 3 million Americans living with the disease, 2.7 million of them over the age of 40. While early detection is key to taking steps to prevent vision loss, glaucomatous vision impairment is irreversible.  Unfortunately, glaucoma can be asymptomatic until the late stages, at which time the prognosis is poor. 

The gold standard for detection and diagnosis of glaucoma is a clinical examination with dilated slit lamp biomicroscopy conducted by a glaucoma specialist.  However, this level of expertise is not always feasible or readily available to broadly evaluate an aging population. Exam efficiency has been increasingly addressed via use of color digital stereoscopic photography and/or retinal tomography via SD-OCT.

A recent study explored the potential suitability of ultra-widefield retinal imaging in supporting the diagnosis of glaucoma in situations where slit-lamp biomicroscopy or digital color stereoscopy are not available. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of UWF in estimating Vertical Cup to Disc Ratio (VCDR) measurements and was the first study of its kind to explore whether optomap imaging could be suitable as a diagnostic support tool for glaucoma.

The study evaluated the data from color digital stereoscopic fundus images (CDS) and UWF images.  All the photographs and images were graded by two masked trained graders and one masked glaucoma specialist. The optomap images were graded using the ‘measure distance’ tool on the OptosAdvance™ software, to measure and record cup to disc ratio (CDR).

The study evaluated the data from color digital stereoscopic fundus images (CDS) and UWF images.  All the photographs and images were graded by two masked trained graders and one masked glaucoma specialist. The optomap images were graded using the ‘measure distance’ tool on the OptosAdvance™ software, to measure and record cup to disc ratio (CDR).

The study demonstrated an almost perfect agreement between CDS and optomap when assessed by the glaucoma specialist.   The study concludes that optomap imaging has a high reproducibility in evaluating VCDR and agreement with stereoscopic optic disc imaging and indicates that UWF imaging may be suitable for glaucoma evaluation in settings where CDS is not available.

Glaucoma optomap image courtesy of William Lesko, MD

Visit our website to review additional clinical studies and learn more about utilizing sight-saving optomap technology.

https://nei.nih.gov/nehep/ham

https://www.brightfocus.org/glaucoma/article/glaucoma-facts-figures