Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month – optomap Making a Difference

Posted on August 23rd, 2019 by

As we continue to recognize August as Children’s Eye Health and Safety month, it’s important to understand the importance of eye exams, and the utilization of the highest-level technology in pediatric screening.  Optos ultra-widefield (UWF™) imaging technology is making great strides in diagnosing and treating eye problems in children and infants. Due to the cutting-edge modalities and ease-of-operation with an optomap® exam, signs of retinal disease can be found in the periphery, often before children and infants become symptomatic. Many vision problems begin at an early age, so it’s important for children to receive proper eye care.   optomap was founded by Douglas Anderson after his then five-year-old son Leif went blind in one eye when a retinal detachment was detected too late. Although his son was having regular eye exams, routine exams were uncomfortable, especially for a child, which made it impossible for the doctor to conduct a complete exam and view the entire retina. He set out to create a way of non-invasively capturing as much of the retina as possible.in a single capture. Results from several published clinical studies suggest that optomap is an essential element to the screening and management of pediatric patients.  While traditional fundus imaging is a multi-stage effort …
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Back to School Checklist: Don’t Forget the Eye Exam!

Posted on August 9th, 2019 by

With school starting up again, and lists including everything from the essential newest styles to school supplies – one item to make sure is on the list is your child’s comprehensive eye exam.  While we may notice subtle changes in appearance as our children grow and develop, there are many changes also occurring within the eye that are unseen.  This marks the importance of annual eye exams that will assist in monitoring the development of your child’s vision as they grow.  Routine vision screening or eye examination at an early age is very important to detect risk factors, such as lazy eye, crossed eyes, and color blindness that can potentially cause irreversible loss of vision or blindness.  A majority of vision impairment issues go undetected since young children with impaired vision are often unaware of their vision issues—it is, after all, how they’ve always seen things. It is on us as parents and educators to look for signs of visual impairment.

Although schools generally do some basic testing of children’s vision, there is no doctor to perform a comprehensive exam or diagnose problems with your child’s eyesight.  According to experts, nearly 90 percent of what is taught in school is …
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Ultraviolet Radiation and Your Eyes: Get Sun Smart!

Posted on July 19th, 2019 by

As the summer heats up many of us are eager to enjoy the warmth of the sun and the activities that go along with it.  While continued awareness of the importance of UV protective clothing and sunscreen exists, there is a lack of emphasis on the impacts the sun and UV exposure has on the eyes.  UV damage to the eyes is known as the “invisible threat” and its impacts are measured and classified by the strength of the UV ray in nanometers (nm).  

UVC: These rays are below 280 nm. The upper atmosphere absorbs these, so they do not reach us, therefore protection from these rays is not overly necessary.

UVB: These are between 315 – 380 nm. These manage to make it to the earth’s surface and are notorious for damaging sight. They can cause snow blindness but are notably responsible for sunburn and several types of skin cancer. Research has shown that these rays are strongest during the summer and at higher altitudes.

UVA: These are the most dangerous being 315 – 380 nm. They are known for causing chronic eye damage. Studies have indicated that these rays get absorbed by the lenses of our eyes …
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Celebrate Safely and Protect your Eyes this Summer

Posted on June 28th, 2019 by

One of our favorite times of the year in the United States surrounded by cookouts, pool parties, friends and family, the 4th of July is upon us.  In addition to all the splendor, the month surrounding July 4th festivities also brings an increase of fireworks displays as well as an increase in firework-related injuries.  Prevent Blindness America and the American Academy of Blindness sponsor June and July as Fireworks Eye Safety Months to raise awareness of the dangers, as well as, the safe protocols for viewing or handling pyrotechnic displays or devices. Most fireworks-related injuries occur during the month of July, and according to the most recent Consumer Product Safety Commission report, 14% of fireworks injuries have been eye injuries occurring mostly in children between the ages of 10 and 14.   It is easy for any of us to get caught up in all the excitement and activity or become distracted by hosting responsibilities, conversations, and crowds.  Take into consideration, as well, that these festivities and shows are generally conducted past dusk and simply navigating an event with numerous people and smoke can become challenging, let alone successfully dodging the sparkler-wielding children. Keep yourself, your children and your eyes safe this summer …
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Helping You See Better: June is Cataract Awareness Month

Posted on June 21st, 2019 by

Helping You See Better: June is Cataract Awareness Month

Presently, cataracts are considered the leading cause of vision loss in the United States.  24 million Americans, over the age of 40 are affected by cataracts.  This June, Optos joins Prevent Blindness America in observing Cataract Awareness Month to aid in the education surrounding cataracts, and what you should know.

What are Cataracts?

Inside our eyes, we have a natural lens. The lens refracts light rays that come into the eye to help us see. The lens should be clear, like the top lens in the illustration. With the presence of cataracts, the lens has become cloudy, much like looking through a foggy or dusty car windshield. Things look blurry, hazy or less colorful with a cataract.

Vision changes you may notice if you have a cataract:

Having blurry vision Seeing double Extra sensitive to light Having trouble seeing well at night, or needing more light while reading Seeing bright colors as faded or yellow instead

What Causes Cataracts?

Exact causes of a cataract are unknown, most often they are a part of getting older.  There are some key possible risk factors that have been identified in those at risk, such …
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