Optos plc, unveils Silverstone, a Combined Ultra-widefield Retinal Imaging Device and UWF-Guided Swept Source OCT for the Ophthalmic Market

12 October 2019

Optos plc, the leading medical retinal imaging company, part of Nikon Corporation, is pleased to announce the launch of Silverstone at the American Academy of Ophthalmology, San Francisco, CA.

Silverstone is the first of its kind, combining world-leading ultra-widefield retinal imaging with integrated, image-guided, swept source OCT.  Silverstone produces a 200° single capture optomap® image with guided OCT allowing advanced OCT imaging anywhere across the retina, from posterior pole to far periphery.  This provides unparalleled UWF guided multimodal imaging in support of detection, investigation and monitoring of retinal disease.

Silverstone provides greater imaging functionality and expands the Company’s product portfolio for ophthalmic markets.  It combines colour, autofluorescence (AF), fluorescein (FA) and Indocyanine Green (ICG) angiography with Swept Source OCT imaging capabilities.  A comprehensive exam that includes an ultra-widefield optomap® image has been shown in clinical studies to enhance pathology detection and disease management, as well as to improve clinic flow.  Now by integrating swept source OCT, Silverstone further facilitates examination of the retina from vitreous through the choroidal-scleral interface and helps guide treatment decisions.

Silverstone SS OCT

David M. Brown, MD from Retina Consultants of Houston in Houston, TX, remarked, “Silverstone is very exciting.  It’s definitely the best device we’ve seen for choroidal imaging, and the UWF-guided OCT makes it easy to scan lesions even in the far periphery.”

Robert Kennedy, CEO of Optos, commented:  I am delighted to introduce Silverstone, our newest offering for the ophthalmic market. The integration of UWF guided swept source OCT with optomap gives eye care professionals unprecedented capability to manage retinal disease.  For the first time, doctors can capture OCT scans of peripheral lesions something not readily achievable with traditional OCTs.  We are extremely excited to introduce this comprehensive solution for patient imaging to our customers.

Further product details are available at www.optosnextgen.com.

Enquiries:

Leslie Amodei, VP, Global Marketing Tel: 508-787-1414

Single-capture, Ultra-widefield Retinal Imaging Is More Efficient – By Definition

Results from a recent publication call for the use of consistent nomenclature when describing the field of view captured by retinal images. The International Widefield Imaging Study Group has proposed the need for consistent nomenclature for widefield and ultra-widefield imaging based on normal anatomic landmarks. When describing the area captured by an imaging modality, it is important to be consistent in meaning so the capabilities of the technology are clear to the reader.

The panel defines ultra-widefield as images showing retinal anatomy anterior to the vortex vein ampullae in all four quadrants.  Widefield is defined as an image centered on the fovea and includes the retina in all four quadrants posterior to and including the vortex vein ampullae. The panel recommends this standardized nomenclature for use in future publications1.

Over the last decade, many large studies have underlined the importance of appropriately imaging the periphery to support the detection and management of disease in a variety of areas including telemedicine screening2,3,4, diabetic retinopathy5,6, age-related maculardegeneration7, vascular disease8, pediatric retinal disease9, inflammatory disease10,11,12 and even some systemic diseases.  Consistently, optomap imaging has been demonstrated to capture the widest field of view in a single capture of any imaging technology14,15,16,17.

“A single capture image which provides a view of the vortex veins in all four quadrants and beyond, thus meeting the widefield & ultra-widefield definitions, would offer enhanced efficiency in a real-world clinical setting versus a montage image, whether it be manual or automated.”   
— Netan Choudhry M.D. FRCS(C) DABO

Ultra-widefield by definition
optomap color and fa images demonstrating four (4) vortex ampullae which define the boundary between widefield and ultra-widefield.

Based on the panel’s findings, a single capture ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal image, or an image with “no sweeps” can therefore provide enhanced efficiencies for practices and other clinical settings. As the ONLY single-capture UWF image to meet this definition, optomap, is the best choice for increasing efficiencies in your practice or other clinical settings.

Increase your practice efficiency and increase your revenue with optomap. No Sweeps = Increased Efficiency.

Read the full summary here: https://optos.is/NoSweepsUWF and then contact us to find out how to put optomap into your clinical setting.

Workplace Eye Wellness and the Importance of Comprehensive Eye Exams for All

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), thousands of people in the U.S. suffer eye injuries while on the job which will require medical attention. Each day, over 2,000 Americans suffer an eye injury. This means that almost one million Americans have experienced some vision loss due to eye injury.  While most of these injuries are attributed to small particles like dust or wood chips hitting the eye, other injuries can result from a sharp object penetrating the eye or blunt force trauma, which can cause permanent vision loss or even the loss of an eye. Workers in other industries, such as health care, face the risk of coming in contact with an infectious disease if proper precautions aren’t taken.

March has been deemed Workplace Eye Wellness Month in order to shed light on preventable eye injuries and share some pointers for workers to keep their eyes safe while at work.  Its often assumed that work-related eye injuries are isolated to outdoor jobs and those relating to physical labor but ironically, the most common eye problem in the workplace is computer vision syndrome.

Making routine eye exams a part of a yearly, preventative routine aid in the strides to prevent illness rather than treat it as it appears, but for many it is still not the norm.  Many adults with 20/20 vision and no eye-related symptoms will often forgo an annual eye exam, while many ocular diseases are asymptomatic in early stages.  Early detection of these diseases can have a significant impact on courses of treatment and the probability of positive outcomes.

Eyecare professionals can greatly enhance their comprehensive exams with the use of ultra-widefield (UWF™) optomap technologyoptomap is specifically designed to provide an UWF image of the retina, and it is the only technology that captures 200-degrees of the retina a single capture and in less than ½ second. One illustration of how UWF imaging can improve the early detection of eye disease are the results of what amounts to an inadvertent experiment in the screening of healthy individuals. Training for Optos users and new Optos employees requires hands-on training on UWF imaging systems. Part of that involves trainees taking optomap images of themselves.  These training exercises have revealed some surprising results:

— Chad, who had no history of eye problems. Prior to coming to Optos his full schedule and absence of symptoms had made getting an optometric exam a low priority. During training Chad’s instructor observed faint retinoschisis on one of Chad’s optomap images. Further examination using eye steering enabled Chad and his instructor to fully visualize the extent of Chad’s retinoschisis, which included holes in a larger area of retinoschisis in his right eye. Chad’s now receiving regular medical care and follow-up.

— Scott’s initial instruction included routine color optomap images of his own eyes. Then, in early August, he imaged himself during a training session and noticed an area in his upper right eye that he’d not seen on earlier images. Unsure of what this was, he kept track of it during other training sessions. In late August Scott imaged himself again during a training session at an ophthalmic practice and this time the suspect area had resolved itself into something identifiable – a retinal hole. The ophthalmologist participating in the training confirmed this and also observed related leakage. He conferred with Scott and discussed the possible risks associated with his frequent business travel. Scott received laser treatment later that same day.

— Carol, an optical industry professional with 27 years of experience, had never viewed her retina nor had an ultra-widefield examination until she started working for Optos. Then, during a training session with an MD, the doctor stopped Carol as they were viewing color optomap images of her eyes. Asking to look once more at the image of her right eye, the doctor identified an area of retinoschisis visible on the far periphery of the retina. Carol has received follow-up treatment and makes a point during training sessions to image herself and to share her personal experience with the doctors and medical professionals with whom she works.

These stories are by no means unusual, and while not part of a statistically significant study, they make a simple, important statement about ocular healthcare – the wider use of ultra-widefield retinal imaging for routine screening has the potential to significantly improve personal health outcomes. Find an eye care professional who uses optomap, today!

Sources:
https://www.preventblindness.org/protect-your-vision-job
https://yoursightmatters.com/march-is-workplace-eye-wellness-month

 

March 23rd is World Optometry Day

Tomorrow, the 23rd of March is marked as World Optometry Day and the following week as World Optometry Week.  The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) marks this day as an opportunity to draw the spotlight on a key eye care profession and create awareness about optometry and its practices around the world.  On World Optometry Day, optometrists and eye care professionals have the opportunity to spread knowledge and expertise in order to create a huge impact and raise awareness.

World Optometry Day is unique to the profession of optometry and serves as a reminder that while globally there may be different definitions, ultimately eye care professionals worldwide are striving to provide the same things, comprehensive eye care services to their patients.  The World Council of Optometry (WCO) defines optometry as “a healthcare profession that is autonomous, educated and regulated, and optometrists are the primary healthcare practitioners of the eye and visual system who provide comprehensive eye and vision care, which includes refraction and dispensing, detection/diagnoses and management of disease in the eye, and the rehabilitation of conditions of the visual system.”

Sight is known to be the most important of the five senses. In fact, the brain receives 80 percent of its information from the eyes. In a national survey, most Americans said that losing their vision would affect their lives more than losing memory, speech, hearing, an arm or a leg.  Globally, optometrists share a vision of a world where optometry provides high quality and comprehensive eye care where its accessible to all people.  Blindness and vision impairment affect more than 600 million people around the world, according to the IAPB. Many cases are because individuals do not have access to the eye exams and eyeglasses they need.  Optos is dedicated to helping eye care professionals aid people across the globe receive the quality eye exams necessary for good vision.

Optos offers optomap®, an ultra-widefield retinal imaging (UWF™) retinal imaging method that facilitates early detection from vision impairment or blindness, and other systemic disease. The unique UWF imaging of optomap captures more than 80% of the retina in a single image, whereas small-field methods reveal only 10 – 15%. Our eye care partners generally include optomap as part of their standard comprehensive eye exam. Ask your eye care professional about optomap today.

Sources:
https://worldcouncilofoptometry.info/tag/world-optometry-day/
https://www.iapb.org/news_tags/world-optometry-day/
http://www.srmuniv.ac.in/content/world-optometry-day

See you at Javits for Vision Expo East (VEE) 2019!

We can’t wait to see you this year as VEE kicks off, March 21-24 at the Javits Convention Center in downtown NYC. During VEE 2019, you’ll have the opportunity to obtain CE credits at events like the March Mania Imaging Track, learn techniques to improve your practice and get access to cutting-edge products and services, such as the ONLY true ultra-widefield retinal image, optomap. VEE also presents an excellent opportunity to network and socialize with eyecare experts and explore New York City, such as the ones that will be available in our booth, MS4849.

We encourage you to find out what’s new at Optos by pre-scheduling your demonstration or stop by our booth at your convenience. Since last year’s conference, we have continued to develop hardware and software platforms to offer new ways to enhance clinical exams.

If you have any questions about our UWF retinal imaging or our offerings at VEE, please call 1-800-854-3039 or email. We look forward to seeing you at the show!