See you at Javits for Vision Expo East (VEE) 2019!

We can’t wait to see you this year as VEE kicks off, March 21-24 at the Javits Convention Center in downtown NYC. During VEE 2019, you’ll have the opportunity to obtain CE credits at events like the March Mania Imaging Track, learn techniques to improve your practice and get access to cutting-edge products and services, such as the ONLY true ultra-widefield retinal image, optomap. VEE also presents an excellent opportunity to network and socialize with eyecare experts and explore New York City, such as the ones that will be available in our booth, MS4849.

We encourage you to find out what’s new at Optos by pre-scheduling your demonstration or stop by our booth at your convenience. Since last year’s conference, we have continued to develop hardware and software platforms to offer new ways to enhance clinical exams.

If you have any questions about our UWF retinal imaging or our offerings at VEE, please call 1-800-854-3039 or email. We look forward to seeing you at the show!

optomap Image Reveals Life-Threatening Pathology During Routine Eye Exam

Jessica describes the events of that October 2017 day as somewhat serendipitous, even though what transpired illuminated a hidden threat to her life.  Jessica, an actress, had just started rehearsing for a play in Billings, Montana, when she decided that contacts, rather than glasses, would better suit her part.  “Really, I just thought it would be a good idea to be able to see while I was on stage,“ she laughs. “That’s all I needed was to get fitted for contacts. I didn’t feel that I needed, nor did I have time for, an eye exam.  Besides I absolutely despise being dilated.”  However, as fate would have it, she went that day to see Tom Felstet, OD, who feels strongly that a thorough view of the retina should be a part of every eye exam. Accordingly, Felstet had made it a priority to purchase an optomap ultra-widefield (UWF™) imaging device when he opened his new practice four years ago. He had the opportunity to utilize the technology during medical school and during his early years in practice. optomap is the only technology that captures over 80% of the retina in a single image, and it does so in a fraction of a second through an undilated pupil. When patients come to see Felstet he explains to them that it is important to have a comprehensive eye exam. He gives them the option to be dilated or, for a small fee, to have optomap screening without dilation.  “Like many practitioners, I have always told my patients that they need to have a dilated exam at least every other year.” he explains. However, he stresses that changed after his experience with Jessica.  “Now, it’s every year.  I give all my patients the choice of dilation or an optomap exam. Over the past few years utilizing optomap I have realized that I discover far more pathology, often far sooner, than I might without it. I have found changes and pathology, that I could have missed otherwise.”

Felstet recalls that when Jessica came to see him that day, she was clearly in a hurry and quite adamant that she simply needed a contacts prescription and did not want to be dilated.  “She was a healthy woman in her mid-50’s, with no remarkable family history and she did not report any symptoms. But fortunately for her she checked the box to get the optomap screening.”

When Dr. Felstet walked in to see Jessica he took one look at her image up on the screen and saw very clearly that there was a lesion in her right eye. “It was just far enough out that it would have been missed on an undilated slit lamp examination,” notes Felstet. When he showed it to Jessica he explained the area of concern and indicated that she should see an ophthalmologist.  “He was very discreet,” Jessica recounts. “I know he did not want to alarm me.  I could see quite clearly what he was talking about on the image, but even then, I was not really worried.”  Jessica recalls that even when she did see the ophthalmologist, and he diagnosed the pathology as a choroidal melanoma, she still had difficulty accepting the gravity of the situation.  “I mean, who had ever heard of a melanoma of the eye?  That wasn’t even something on my radar.  I had noticed some little flashes of light, but they were insignificant, and I just passed it off as reflections from some new glasses. Besides, in all other respects I was quite healthy.”

Jessica was then referred to an ocular oncologist in Denver and it was not until then that she grasped the significance of what was occurring.  “My tumor was 11 mm wide, so it was right on the cusp – just ½ mm from what would have resulted in an automatic enucleation. Jessica was treated immediately and successfully with radioactive plaque therapy, but during surgery the tumor was biopsied revealing that she was genetically at high risk for metastases, particularly to the liver. Ocular melanoma tends to be aggressive and metastasizes, or spreads to other organs in the body, in about half of all cases.

Felstet says that he still gets chills when he thinks of how close Jessica came to losing her eye and how disruptive this experience was for him as a practitioner.  He underscores that he has always been committed to providing comprehensive eye care, however he gives extra priority to communicating to his patients the critical importance of having a thorough examination of the retina every year.

“It is interesting to me how close that tumor was to her macula and yet she was not aware of any changes to her vision in that field, if she had not come in for her contacts when she did and if we had allowed her to refuse dilation, or an optomap, she would have likely lost her eye or could have lost her life.” He muses, “She returned to me recently and we took another optomap image, in looking at it I think that it is amazing that she is still here but that she also still has her central vision.  Looking at that image again, I told her that she is miracle.”

Felstet notes that he has detected numerous pathologies since Jessica’s visit, from subtle pigment changes that suggested dangerous lesions, to BRVO in young, outwardly healthy individuals.  “I am much more direct now about the importance of getting an optomap and about what I see on those images. I really would not want to practice without it because it would be hard to miss something as the pathology really stands out.  It gives me enormous peace of mind.”  Felstet is confident that optomap UWF will become the gold standard of care. “It helps me provide the best service to my patients.  I honestly think there is no reason to practice without it.”

Read Dr. Felset’s full testimonial here

Optos is committed to educating all on the importance of having regular eye exams.  Protect your eye health by making optomap part of your yearly comprehensive eye exam.  Visit our website for more sight-saving stories like Jessica’s and to find an optomap provider near you to schedule your eye exam today!

Glaucoma – the “Sneak Thief of Sight”

Currently, there are more than 3 million people in the United States and over 60 million worldwide living with glaucoma, otherwise known as “the sneak thief of sight”.  It is estimated that half of those with glaucoma, do not know they have it.  The disease presents no symptoms and is the leading cause of irreversible blindness, taking as much as 40% of sight without notice.  January has been deemed National Glaucoma Awareness Month and is an important time to spread the world about this sight-stealing disease.

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that gradually progress, stealing sight, without symptom. Glaucoma can affect people of all ages but is most prevalent in middle-aged adults and the elderly.  While there is no cure, surgery or medication can slow its affects and help to prevent further vision loss.  The word ‘glaucoma’ is actually an umbrella term for a group of eye diseases that damage the delicate fibers that run from your eye to your optic nerve, which is the nerve that carries information about the images your eye sees to your brain. This damage is often the result of high fluid pressure inside the eye.

What can you do?

It is important to know your risks, those at higher risk include people of African, Asian, and Hispanic descent. Other high-risk groups include: people over 60, family members of those already diagnosed, diabetics, and people who are severely nearsighted.  Annual comprehensive eye exams are important to detect, prevent and treat the effects of the disease.

optomap’s role in the management of glaucoma

Results from recently published clinical studies suggest that optomap ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal imaging may play an essential role in glaucoma management.  optomap enables eyecare professionals to discover, diagnose, document and treat ocular pathology that may first present in the periphery.  optomap is a high resolution single capture image of 82% or 200 degrees of the retina.  Currently, the gold standard tool for glaucoma detection is a clinical examination with a dilated slit-lamp bio-microscopy carried out by a glaucoma specialist to assess the optic disc.  Recent studies suggest that UWF imaging may be suitable for diagnosing glaucoma in situations where slit-lamp bio-microscopy or digital color stereoscopy are not available.  Another study also confirms that optomap has almost perfect agreement with color digital stereoscopy when assessed
by a glaucoma specialist. Continued reading on these studies and additional findings here

stereo pair of optic nerve head images with can be viewed using a stereo viewer, when there is suspicion of glaucoma

optomap is continuing to become a key player in the role of eye care professionals.  optomap provides details needed for specialty exams, while simultaneously delivering an integrated view to the eye, as said by Dr. Savak Tymoorian, MD of Harvard Eye Associates. When Dr. Tymoorian first began using Optos technology, he employed it primary for patients presenting with flashers or floaters.  While reviewing the images, he was able to pick up on more peripheral issues and early indicators of pathology.  “The more I use the device, the more I appreciate this dynamic technology, I now image all my patients this way”, states Tymoorian.   As a glaucoma specialist, Dr Tymoorian finds that optomap helps reassure him that he is not missing peripheral issues that could be relevant to the disease.

Recognizing January as National Glaucoma Awareness Month, allows us to shed light on glaucoma and stress the importance of protecting your sight and preventing the onset of the disease.  The best way to protect your sight from glaucoma is to get a comprehensive eye examination. This way, if you have glaucoma, treatment can begin immediately.

optomap UWF imaging captures more than 80% of the retina in a single image, whereas traditional imaging methods can sometimes only reveal 10 – 15%.  optomap is a fast and easy addition to a standard comprehensive eye exam.  Don’t hesitate, and ask your eye care professional about optomap today.

Ultra-widefield optomap Devices Continue to Set Doctors on the Forefront of Diagnostic Capability

For as long as Dr. David Way, OD, has been in practice, he has endeavored to employ frontline technology in the care of his patients. He explains that it was because of this he was an early adopter of optomap ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal imaging technology.  Way is a big proponent of thoroughly examining the retina and aims to help patients understand the importance of comprehensive retinal exams.  “I help them to understand that the eye is the only part of the body that we can observe nerves and blood vessels without doing a CRT or an MRI; and that when I am examining them, I am checking ocular health, as well as, indicators of issues such diabetes, glaucoma, macular degeneration or hypertension”, explains Way.

Patients often refuse to be dilated because they are in a hurry, or simply want to avoid the discomfort. An optomap image, which can be obtained in a fraction of a second through an undilated pupil, allows them to receive a retinal exam without the perceived inconvenience. Over the years at Way’s practice, Spring Klein Vision Center, the acceptance rate for optomap is over 70% which has proved to be a revenue generator and a boon to practice flow.

 

Dr. Way started out in his private practice with optomap and later upgraded his device model to the Daytona, which quickly paid for itself. Dr. Way had no intention of upgrading again until he experienced the recently released Monaco, the first and only combined UWF and OCT device.   “When I saw what Monaco could do, I was floored,” Way explains. “I just knew I had to move forward with the purchase when I saw the multi-modality capabilities of Monaco. The fact that I can pull up color, autofluorescence and OCT on both eyes, at the same time, gives me a full spectrum view of the eye. The images are incredibly clear and detailed; even in the far periphery. The decision to purchase was really a no-brainer.”

Dr. Way stresses that the ability to walk into an exam room and immediately see all three modalities represented on the screen, enables him to make a quick initial assessment of how the exam should proceed. Way asserts that optomap technology has differentiated his practice for over a decade and that Monaco will continue to set him at the forefront of diagnostic capability in his area. “Patients notice the difference. If they come in and see our updated technology – and when they see and understand their own eye for the first time, they are probably not going to return to a practice without that capability. They request optomap when they return because they want the reassurance that their eyes are fine. Monaco solidifies that we are the upper echelon of practices that have the capability to image and compare year after year. I feel comfortable and reassured that I have provided the best care possible.”  Read Dr. Way’s full practice testimonial here

Monaco produces a 200° single-capture optomap image in less than ½ second and provides cross-sectional 40° OCT views of retinal structures. Monaco enables a rapid multi-modality capture featuring color, autofluorescence and OCT scans, for both eyes, in as little as two minutes.  UWF with integrated OCT saves time, space, and minimizes patient movement.  optomap images and OCT scans are correlated to facilitate pathology examination. Color, AF, and OCT images are shown in a single, comprehensive view on a single device.

Take advantage of Section 179 tax savings (US-based only) on any Optos ultra-widefield imaging device, including Monaco.  To learn more about Monaco, other ultra-widefield devices from Optos and how you can utilize Section 179 on the purchase of any new optomap device, visit our website.

Join us at Vision Expo West 2018!

Find out what’s new from Optos!

As the leaders in ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal imaging technology, Optos would like to invite you to join us at the International Vision Expo West (VEW) September 26-29 at the Sands Expo in Las Vegas.    Explore what’s new at Optos by pre-scheduling your demonstration or stop by booth #MS6051 during the show.

Optos Announces Global Availability of Monaco — The Only Clinically-Validated, 200-Degree UWF Retinal Image with Integrated OCT

Optos has continued to develop hardware and software platforms— most recently delivering Monaco, the latest device which offers new ways to enhance clinical exams. It is the only UWF retinal imaging device with integrated OCT. Monaco produces a 200-degree, single-capture optomap image in less than ½ second and also provides cross-sectional, 40-degree OCT views of retinal structures. Monaco enables a rapid multi-modality capture featuring color, autofluorescence and OCT scans for both eyes in as little as two minutes. UWF with integrated OCT saves time, space and minimizes patient movement. The optomap images and OCT scans are correlated to facilitate pathology examination. Color, AF and OCT images are shown in a single, comprehensive view on a single device. The introduction of Monaco further differentiates our products with continued ease of use and speed of capture. OCT scans available with the device are: Line Scan, Raster Scan, Retina Topography Scan, Optic nerve Head (OnH) Topography Scan and Retinal nerve Fiber layer (RnFl) Scan.

We have continued development on OptosAdvance™, the comprehensive image management solution for eyecare professionals. It enables clinicians to review, annotate, securely refer and archive images from many eyecare diagnostic devices in their practices using a single, industry-standard DICOM solution. OptosAdvance  provides an ‘all-in-one’ solution for managing clinical eyecare data from any browser. Additionally, data within the screen views can be arranged according to individual users’ preferences.

In addition, Optos offers OptosCloud — the latest storage solution for eyecare professionals utilizing OptosAdvance  Enable your data to be secure and safe while making it more accessible from anywhere.

For more information regarding our offerings at VEW, or if you have any questions about our UWF retinal imaging please call 800-854-3039 or visit optos.is/MonacoUWFandOCT

We look forward to seeing you at the show!